Album Review: WALLS

Intro

Kings of Leon (KOL) are back and fans have had to wait three long years for their seventh studio album and I have to say it was well worth the wait. The ten-track album launched on October 14 and today Feedback give an insight to the most notable songs on the new album WALLS.

kol
(Photo Credit: femaletrumpet02)

 

Waste a Moment

The lead single and first song on the album is Waste a Moment. It’s a very catchy soft rock track and I think it will do very well in the charts.

Right from the get go, Waste a Moment has a noticeably softer tone to it with far more delicate and refined guitar riffs. This is a far cry from the band’s widely successful singles Sex on Fire and Use Somebody.  The softer tone creates a feeling of intimacy with the listener through the well sung lyrics and the emotional meaning behind them.

The track is about your cliché boy meets girl story, however, this change in style for the band suits lead vocalist Caleb Followill. The lack of heavy guitar solos on the track allows his smooth tones to portray a vivid story of a man who really wants to get the girl of his desires and what happens after he finally does.

Overall the track is a fun soft rock number that is well produced and marks a great start to the album.

 

Find Me

This is the fourth, and my favourite, song on the album.

Find Me starts with a rather lengthy but amazing guitar and drum piece that is reminiscent of the band’s previous work. The track, which is the longest on the album, runs with such high pace and energy that it feels like it’s the shortest. Time flies when you’re having fun.

But despite the faster pace of the instruments, Followill’s voice still retains the strong presence it did in Waste a Moment which aids the track in being highly memorable and extremely catchy.

This song is without doubt the only track that keeps to KOL’s old style, which is surely great news for returning fans as well as offering the smoother tones to attract new followers.

 

Muchacho

Despite the Latino name of the song, Muchacho is not a salsa-style piece. Instead, it’s an awful mismatch of genres and was clearly an experimental track that didn’t work.

Muchacho features a very strange synth throughout the track which is something we’ve not really heard KOL do before and I certainly hope it doesn’t crop up again. The synth adds nothing to the song and just distracts from the solid guitar work.

The synth is not the only issue I have with this song. The vocals sound like Followill was attempting to sound like Johnny Cash which doesn’t suit his voice at all.

I despise this song as it seemingly has no clear objective of what it wants to be. One second it’s synth-pop, and the next it is a wannabe Johnny Cash hit with a modern twist. As good as the rest of the album is I couldn’t let them get away with this one unharmed.

 

WALLS

Lastly is the final and also title track, WALLS.

Walls is an acoustic track about heartbreak. It may be a troupe of all rock bands to try an emotional song and prove they can play slowly but this one works pretty well.

It’s a very minimalistic tune that only has the melodies and solos of guitarist Matthew Followill and the vocals of older brother Caleb Followill. This really adds to the emotional vibe the lyrics contain. When the chorus is describing a man wanting to lock himself behind huge walls to keep his emotions out, the minimalist sound of the song is most effective.

The song might not be to my usual taste but after hearing it several times it grew on me and I feel that’s the general consensus with this track. You’ll be left confused as to how KOL have made this song but you’ll soon love its addictive acoustics.

 

Final thoughts:

Walls is a really solid album which has clearly had a lot of time and effort put into it over the three years since Mechanical Bull. Most of the songs display a healthy slow pace but the album also has the odd reminder that the band are serous rockers and don’t want their fans to forget that.

 

By Innes Enslin

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